"This is more than a Harbert story. This is a national story. We are a nation of immigrants."
U.S. Representative Fred Upton (Michigan's 6th Congressional District - 8/30/2009)

 

 Give him Liberty or set him Free!

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On August 15, 2005 we launched a new campaign "Ibrahim for Citizen" (view photos). The objective is to secure US citizenship for Ibrahim. We now have the sponsorship we need for a private bill to be brought before the US House of Representatives and the US Senate, to grant citizenship to Ibrahim.  We have compiled the necessary documents for submission.

Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., and Rep. Fred Upton, R-St. Joseph, introduced bills in the Senate and House that would give Ibrahim permanent U.S. residency.

On January 17th, 2007, Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., and Rep. Fred Upton, R-St. Joseph, reintroduced bills in the Senate and House that would give Ibrahim permanent U.S. residency.

On February 10th, 2009, Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., and Rep. Fred Upton, R-St. Joseph, reintroduced bills in the Senate and House that would give Ibrahim permanent U.S. residency.

We have collected over 2500 signatures and over 200 affidavits in support of the private bill.

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: February 10, 2009

Contacts: Tara Andringa (Levin) 202-228-3685
                 Sean Bonyun (Upton) 202-225-3761

Levin, Upton Introduce Bills to Give Parlak Permanent Residency

WASHINGTON - Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., and Rep. Fred Upton, R-St. Joseph, introduced bills in the Senate and House today that would give permanent U.S. residency to Mr. Ibrahim Parlak, a Kurdish immigrant living in southwest Michigan. Upton and Levin introduced similar measures on behalf of Mr. Parlak in the 109th and 110th Congresses.

Parlak, a Kurd born in southern Turkey, came to the United States seeking asylum in 1991. In his asylum application, Parlak disclosed that he had been associated with the PKK in the 1980s, that he was involved in an armed skirmish at the Turkish border in 1988, and that he had been imprisoned in Turkey as a result. In 1992, Immigration and Naturalization Service determined that Parlak had a credible fear of returning to Turkey and granted him asylum.

The Department of Homeland Security objects to Parlak's I-485 (Application to Adjust to Permanent Resident Status) because he did not state that he had been arrested in another country. However, in Parlak's application for asylum in 1991, he set forth in great detail his past association with the Kurdistan Worker's Party (PKK) and his resulting imprisonment in Turkey in the 1980s when he successfully sought asylum in the U.S. in 1991, and that he has been a model immigrant and local business owner for many years. This information was available to the immigration official who oversaw his application for Legal Permanent Residency in 1993.

"Mr. Parlak is a good citizen and should be allowed to remain in the United States and continue the honorable life that he has built for his community, his daughter and himself all these years," Levin said.

"Today, we renew our efforts on behalf of Ibrahim Parlak," said Upton. "Although this is a new Congress, we remain steadfast in our commitment to Mr. Parlak as his situation remains unresolved. The bill that I re-introduced today in the House, in tandem with Senator Levin's measure, will grant Ibrahim Parlak and his family the peace of mind of permanent residency in the United States. This exercise has gone on long enough - Mr. Parlak deserves the chance to remain in his community and raise his daughter, without the daily fear of arrest or deportation."

"It is incongruous to conclude that he was intentionally hiding those facts from the Department of Justice in 1993, when he detailed them explicitly to the Department of Justice in 1991," Levin said.

Senate Bill S403         House Bill HR976.

***********************************************

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 17, 2007

Contacts: Tara Andringa (Levin) 202-228-3685
Sean Bonyun (Upton) 202-225-3761

Levin, Upton Introduce Bills to Give Parlak Permanent Residency

WASHINGTON - Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., and Rep. Fred Upton, R-St. Joseph, introduced bills in the Senate and House today that would give permanent U.S. residency to Mr. Ibrahim Parlak, a Kurdish immigrant living in southwest Michigan.  The Department of Homeland Security has threatened to deport Parlak due to his failure to report on his application for permanent resident status that he had been arrested in another country.  However, Levin and Upton maintain that Parlak disclosed in great detail his past association with the Kurdistan Worker's Party (PKK) and his resulting imprisonment in Turkey in the 1980s when he successfully sought asylum in the U.S. in 1991, and that he has been a model immigrant and local business owner for many years.

"Mr. Parlak is a good citizen and should be allowed to remain in the United States and continue the honorable life that he has built for his community, his daughter, and himself all these years," Levin said.

"Today, we renew our efforts on behalf of Ibrahim Parlak," said Upton.  " Although this is a new Congress, we remain steadfast in our commitment to Mr. Parlak as his situation remains unresolved.  The bill that I re-introduced today in the House, in tandem with Senator Levin's measure, will grant Ibrahim Parlak and his family the peace of mind of permanent residency in the United States.  He should be given the chance to remain in his community and raise his daughter, without any fear of arrest or deportation."

Parlak, a Kurd born in southern Turkey, came to the United States seeking asylum in 1991.   In his asylum application, Parlak disclosed that he had been associated with the PKK in the 1980s, that he was involved in an armed skirmish at the Turkish border in 1988, and that he had been imprisoned in Turkey as a result.  In 1992, Immigration and Naturalization Service determined that Parlak had a credible fear of returning to Turkey and granted him asylum.

The Department of Homeland Security argues that Parlak committed fraud on his I-485 (Application to Adjust to Permanent Resident Status) because he failed to state that he had been arrested, indicted, or convicted in any country.  However, in Parlak's application for asylum in 1991, he set forth in great detail his role in the PKK, his presence at a violent exchange with Turkish soldiers and his trials and imprisonment in Turkey. This information was available to the immigration official who oversaw his application for Legal Permanent Residency in 1993.

"It is incongruous to conclude that he was intentionally hiding those facts from the Department of Justice in 1993, when he detailed them explicitly to the Department of Justice in 1991," Levin said.

            Senate Bill S. 313       House Bill H.R. 546

***********************************************

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

December 13, 2005

Contacts:  Tara Andringa  (Levin) 202-228-3685
Sean Bonyun (Upton) 202-225-3761

Levin, Upton Introduce Bills to Give Parlak Permanent Residency

WASHINGTON - Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., and Rep. Fred Upton, R-St. Joseph, introduced bills in the Senate and House today that would give permanent U.S. residency to Mr. Ibrahim Parlak, a Kurdish immigrant living in southwest Michigan.  The Department of Homeland Security has threatened to deport Parlak due to his failure to report that he had been arrested in another country on his application for permanent resident status.  However, Levin and Upton maintain that Parlak disclosed in great detail his past association with the Kurdistan Worker’s Party (PKK) and his resulting imprisonment in Turkey in the 1980s when he successfully sought asylum in the U.S. in 1991, and that he has been a model immigrant and local business owner for many years.

"Mr. Parlak is a good man and a model immigrant," Levin said.  "He should be given the chance to remain in the United States and continue the life that he has built for his community, his daughter and himself all these years."

"The bill that I introduced in the House, in tandem with Senator Levin's measure, will grant Ibrahim Parlak and his family the peace of mind of permanent residency in the United States," said Upton.  "Mr. Parlak should be given the chance to remain in his community and raise his daughter, without any fear of arrest or deportation."

Parlak, a Kurd born in southern Turkey, came to the United States seeking asylum in 1991.  In his asylum application, Parlak disclosed that he had been associated with the PKK in the 1980s, that he was involved in an armed skirmish at the Turkish border in 1988, and that he had been imprisoned in Turkey as a result of these facts.  In 1992, Immigration and Naturalization Service determined that Parlak had a credible fear of returning to Turkey and granted him asylum due to the persecution that he suffered at the hands of the Turkish government.

The Department of Homeland Security argues that Parlak committed fraud on his I-485 (Application to Adjust to Permanent Resident Status) because he failed to admit that he had been arrested, indicted, or convicted in any country.  However, in Parlak’s application for asylum in 1991, he set forth in great detail his role in the PKK, his presence at a violent exchange with Turkish soldiers and his trials and imprisonment in Turkey.  This information was available to the immigration official who oversaw his application for Legal Permanent Residency in 1993.

"It is incongruous to conclude that he was intentionally hiding those facts from the Department of Justice in 1993, when he detailed them explicitly to the Department of Justice in 1991," Levin said.

            Senate Bill S. 2090       House Bill H.R. 4523

"Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves."
Abraham Lincoln